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      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2017
     
    here is a link to the description. http://www.careliving.org/compassion-fatigue-dr-tam-cummings/

    I scored high in burnout, average in the other two categories
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      CommentAuthormary75*
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2017
     
    I gave this a try and conclude that I can't wait for my tenants to move out.
    • CommentAuthorbhv
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2017
     
    Interesting article thinking about Secondary Traumatic Stress. When I worked in Child Protective Services way back in the 70s we frequently did a rotation between CPS and Adoption services. That helped a lot. The special CPS workers were eager to return after a relatively short stint with Adoptions.
    But this ... Alzheimer's situation. No rotation for that. I frequently think of it as a life sentence for two people ...neither of whom committed a crime.
    I scored low on Satisfaction and High on Burnout. No surprise there.
    But only average on the Secondary Traumatic Stress. That is surprising. Maybe we need another category. Ongoing Stress Disorder. I thought I would be off the charts. Recently went to my doctor to discuss the anti depressant. It's not working and I can't increase the dose of this one. Already tried that. She prescribed somethijng else to try with it. Will try starting that tomorrow. But worried about it. I am constantly irritible and angry. Keeping quiet and pretending to be ok is getting more and more difficult.
    • CommentAuthorJan K
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2017
     
    Charlotte -

    Thank you for the link. I read the article and did the survey, and then started looking for more information on this topic. (I particularly liked in the article when it said that compassion fatigue is treatable, but your physician needs to really hear you when you say you are a caregiver. Guess I'll have to work on speaking (much) louder, because so far most of my doctors really don't understand it at all. When I told one doctor I was a caregiver for a husband with dementia, he said, "Oh--you're a housewife". Not even close.)

    In looking at other articles on this subject, I found a quote by L. R. Knost that seemed really good for caregivers: "Taking care of myself doesn't mean "me first". It means "me too".

    In my case, I think I need to spend a lot more time and energy taking care of "me, too".
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTime2 days ago
     
    I didn't read the above article but I read parts of my journal yesterday, which I kept for almost 9 years. When I look back at what I went through I find it hard to believe I did not collapse from the stress. In some ways, alzheimers and dementia are harder on the caregiver than on the patient. My husband really didn't know what was happening to him. Oh, there were days when he knew something was wrong and he would ask, what is happening to us. But, for me having to pretend you're not angry when you are, walking away from an argument or fight, hearing hurtful words (which I had forgotten about until I re-read what I wrote) and not reacting to them, all of these things are extremely difficult to do, yet I did them.

    I have now been told I could have post-traumatic stress disorder from everything I went through. In many ways, this is probably true. I've only been a widow for almost three months, so it is not impossible. You hold yourself together by a thread for so many years and when it finally ends, you go through another dementia phase.

    Yes, you need to take care of yourselves. If only to get away for a few hours. I waited too long to do this, but when I did it felt so wonderful. I would go to a little village not too far away from where I live and sit outside with a. Up of co
    Free and a book, do a little window shopping and then have lunch. Oh my gosh, it felt wonderful. I wish I had done it sooner. It is truly a lifesaver.