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  1.  
    Has anyone mentioned The Emotional Journey of the Alzheimer Family? You can find that on Amazon. I saw it in the bookstore the other day, and while I was not tempted to relive that journey just now, it looked like a really good relatable read.
    • CommentAuthorJan K
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2015
     
    Keely,
    Thank you for recommending Tom Zuba's book "Permission to Mourn - A New Way to Do Grief". I ordered it, and immediately read the whole book. It was exactly what I needed to hear (or read).
  2.  
    I just re-read Still Alice. Now that I am in the after my thoughts about the book are very different than the first time. Should be must reading for the families coping with early onset disease.
    • CommentAuthorLFL
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2016
     
    Not dementia related but if anyone has a dog suffering from cancer, there is an excellent book "Dog Cancer Survival Guide" by Dr. Damien Dressler, DVM. My little guys has lymphoma. I wish I had know about this excellent reference much sooner.
  3.  
    Fifth Mountain, The Cuckoo calling, God of small things
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2016
     
    Edward Charette, I read two of the books you read and enjoyed both, each quite different. I haven't heard of Fifth Mountain but will be sure to look for it.

    My current recommendation is Kate Atkinson's " A God in Ruins."
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      CommentAuthorol don*
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2017
     
    Speaking of books I recently tried to donate about 50 books to the local VA hospital and was told if they were paperbacks they could make room for them but if they were hard cover they didn't have the space,imagine that,men and women that fought for this country and they didn't have room for some books,I sent an email to the hospital and to this day have never heard back from them,now then if anyone would like some I'll gladly send them free of charge,lots of humor and the latest "Guilty as Sin" best seller by Edward Klein."Armageddon" by Dick Morris also a best seller plus many more,anyone interested email me and I'll try to send a complete list
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      CommentAuthormary75*
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2017
     
    Don, I've had a similar problem, and then I discovered that our local Senior Centre held a book sale every Thursday and were welcoming donations. Nearby churches may, too. A few of them still have rummage sales to raise funds.
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      CommentAuthormary75*
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2017
     
    Don, if "Guilty as Sin" hasn't been spoken for yet, I would very much like to read it. If you need my address, email me. I'll read it on my convalescence from surgery.
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      CommentAuthorol don*
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2017
     
    Yes 75 still have it but for the life of me can't find your mailing address,sorry to hear about surgery,while you know better than most no surgery is "minor' I hope and pray your is minor
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      CommentAuthorol don*
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2017
     
    Whilst going thru the stack of books I found 6-7 by Lewis Grizzard very funny author from Gawja,Billy Graham "Nearing Home" and "The reason for my Hope" "1st Family Detail" by Ron Kessler "Patriots Handbook" Caroline Kennedy Si Cology by Si Robertson(the duck family) and more,free for the asking
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      CommentAuthormary75*
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2017 edited
     
    deleted
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      CommentAuthorol don*
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2017
     
    Glad you enjoyed it,hard to fathom how people can be so crooked and still run the country,I have very little faith in any of them
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2017
     
    I want to recommend The Summer Guest by Justin Cronin. I so enjoyed it and thought it was a beautiful story.
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      CommentAuthormary75*
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2017 edited
     
    deleted
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2017
     
    Mary, I have another one for you, even better that the one above: A Gentleman In Moscow. It's SO good.
  4.  
    Thanks, Bev*, the reviews were stellar, so I ordered it on Audiobooks.
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2017
     
    I hope you enjoy it as much as I did, Marche.
  5.  
    Bev*, A Gentleman in Moscow is a gem. Ironically it is on my bookclub list and I didn't even realize it. I am listening to the audiobook and the reader has a cultured voice that adds a wonderful dimension to the book experience. Thanks for taking time to mention the book here.
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2017
     
    So glad you're enjoying the story, Marche. I know I sure did. I just finished a couple of books and decided I would read a classic, Middlemarch. I try to fit in one every now and then to add to my knowledge. But then I decided I'm going to read The Underground Railroad. I bought a couple of books for my Kindle, something I shouldn't be doing now that I'm a widow. I should be going to the library like Mary.
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2017
     
    I've been reading some good ones this year. Currently: The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri and The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver. Wonderful books!
    • CommentAuthorBev*
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2017
     
    Another excellent book this year: LaRose by Louise Erdrich. Such amazing writing - beautiful words. A wonderful story by an excellent storyteller.
    • CommentAuthorpaulc
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2018
     
    The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, My tale of madness and recovery, by Barbara K. Lipska with Elaine McArdle. Barbara Lipsak is the director of the Human Brain Collection Core at the National Institute of Mental Health.https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_...ntist+Who+Lost+her,aps,141&crid=3I1UV401I0372 It will be on sale April 3, 2018.

    This book provides a view from the inside what some of our spouses are going through.

    Dr. Lipsak was diagnosed with Melanoma brain cancer earlier this decade, which up until recently was the mostly deadly brain cancer. She chronicles her life with the cancer but the book isn't about her treatment or it being a heroic journey or about the work done by her doctors. Rather, it is how the tumors affected her brain. We see someone going through symptoms very similar to someone with dementia, in particular FTD. She sees the similarities between her experience with FTD, Alzheimer's and schizophrenia. He behaviors are so similar to someone with FTD, not surprising since her tumors were in the frontal cortex. She remembers her abnormal behavior and how she felt at the time, which was that her behavior seemed normal to her. She would visit her daughter and fixate the entire weekend about how much Amtrack sucked because her trip took an extra 2 hours due to a tree falling on the track. How nasty she was to a PT who she saw about an unrelated problem. Getting lost in her own neighborhood while running. About her family walking on eggshells due to her behavior. What is different from dementia is that she recovers. At first she doesn't remember much of this time but she slowly recovers her memories. And she wonders how she is different from the person she was from before the tumors. She still has brain damage, she lost the sight in one eye due to losing the optic nerve.

    Towards the end of the book that she covers the effects of her brain tumors on her family. Of how much stress they had. About how they went along with some of her behaviors because they were exaggerations of her normal behavior, that some just seemed OK in context of her life, such as insisting on taking the 7.2 mile walk. And how they worried about her. She does describe why family members might not have the appropriate concern about the behavior of LOs with undiagnosed dementia.
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      CommentAuthormary75*
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2018 edited
     
    deleted
    • CommentAuthorCarolVT
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2018
     
    Paul, I've pre-ordered from Kindle. Thanks for the review. I'm looking forward to reading it.
    • CommentAuthorlindyloo*
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2018
     
    For those of you familiar with THE LEISURE SEEKER, it has been somewhat revised and turned into a movie that has just been released. Since I read it two or three times I am definitely going to go see it when it is scheduled near me.
    • CommentAuthorNicky
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2018
     
    I know I could not watch The Leisure Seeker. Perhaps, I should say I'm not ready to watch that movie. Anything dealing with Alzheimer - I know I can't watch. All I would is cry & I'm crying enough as it is. Anyone else feel this way? I'm sure it's a good movie & I could have watched it before all this happened.

    When my husband was 36 yrs old, he had cancer & it took many years before I could watch any movie with cancer.
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      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2018 edited
     
    I read Leisure Seeker a few years ago. I loved it. I loved how they choice to go fill a dream vs doing what family and doctors wanted them to do until they died. My only problem was him driving the MH with as far a long as he was with AD.

    I don't think I would want to see the movie though. Same with Still Alice. For me sometimes movies don't do the books justice. I first learned that with Love Story - loved the book but not the movie.
    • CommentAuthorpaulc
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2018
     
    Washingtonian's condensation of The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind is a big hit on our web site.

    https://www.washingtonian.com/2018/04/08/im-a-neuroscientist-who-studies-mental-illness-heres-what-happened-when-i-lost-my-own-mind/