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    • CommentAuthorcassie*
    • CommentTimeFeb 21st 2017
     
    Welcome Gary, you seem to have figured out a great deal already, well done. Living in their reality is a hard learnt lesson but the only way to go otherwise you will end up completely doolally yourself.
    FTD changes their personality so very much and it is heartbreaking all the way.Keep reaching out for whatever support you can find, here or elsewhere. Not just for your wife but for you as well.
    That sounds rather negative, sorry. But you seem fully aware of the problems so it is nothing new to you.
    I will just add that there still will be some happy moments so grab them whenever you can.
    • CommentAuthorGJS4406
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2017
     
    Hello cassie and everyone else,

    Yes there are a lot of happy moments that we have. That is because I am living in her reality. I did not think I would have to do it after retirement, but such is life. The one thing I have found reading this board/forum, it is more women saying there husband, not the other way around. I did chat to one man, paulc, and his wife has it. Not to be socially incorrect, but is it perhaps doctors listen more to women as opposed to men? I don't know. I would be interested in your comments.

    Thanks
    •  
      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2017
     
    I think we have concluded that more women go looking for help via the internet and groups than men.
  1.  
    Hello everyone,
    My DH was diagnosed in August 2014. We were high school sweethearts and are now both 55. He seems to be declining fast. He asked me what a shoe was the other day; he didn't know what they were called. I am still working and feel incredibly guilty for wanting time to myself since I have to do everything. He goes to all day daycare and loves it which gives me a lot of piece of mind. Thanks for having this forum. It helps.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2017
     
    Welcome. Sorry you have to join us but this is a great place for you to be when you do.
    • CommentAuthorjulied
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2017
     
    Hello Hestooyoung. I just joined recently too. My husband was diagnosed with EOAD a few months ago. Is it my imagination, or does it seem as though early onset Alzheimer's which is supposedly rare, is more common than people realize? And ah yes,
    guilt. I have a lot of that because I'm already wishing this was over.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2017
     
    Whether more are getting it or they are now diagnosing it correctly instead of some mental health issue. The same is happening for the older people too thanks to living longer. I still believe the increase is due to the stuff in our food, water and air supple destroying those more susceptible.
    • CommentAuthormyrtle*
    • CommentTimeMar 22nd 2017
     
    Welcome, Hestooyoung. A good name because he is too young. Much too young. I'm glad you've got him in daycare. It sure saved my life.

    I'm not sure that EOAD is actually increasing but I do think that more people whose spouses have it are joining this website. I hope you will be able to get some comfort from their experiences and that they will get some from yours.
  2.  
    Hi everyone. I was so happy to find youze (Philly-speak). The main Alz.org site is just a little overwhelming for me. My dear, brilliant, kind, witty husband of almost 25 years (2nd marriage for both and BEST marriage in the universe) was diagnosed almost 3 years ago, a few months after my beloved mother died. It appears to be early-onset Alzheimer's, we've been shuffled around by providers and will finally see U of P's Penn Memory Care later this month. Not that it matters much at this point. My husband began to have noticeable symptoms early in his 60s; he'll be 68 on Tuesday. I'm his trophy wife (yeah, right!) of 63. Does anyone else think that EOAD moves more quickly than Alzheimer's that begins in old age? Because his dementia is moving so swiftly that it takes my breath (and heart & soul) away. I can't imagine how it could possibly get worse but. of course, it will. He has lost so much ground in the past 6 months that I wonder what will become of us. Neither of us have family nearby, we have no children and our friends are either still working or have drifted away (as I'm sure, we have too). We've hired a wonderful social worker and the first thing she did was determine that we could never, ever afford to to move to a community with Memory Care. On the plus side, I am so very blessed to have met the true love of my life and as I saw on another site tonight, it is my honor to serve him and give him back just a small portion of what he has brought to my life. Now, tell me, howz are youse guys doin'?
    •  
      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2017
     
    Welcome and sorry you had to join us but this is a great place for support and information. There is lots to read.

    As for EOAD going faster - it depends on the person but it does seem those diagnosed in their 40s and 50s do go faster. Women seem to go faster, too. We had one woman on here whose husband was gone in 2 years. My SIL was diagnosed at 55 and died 9 years later. MY FIL was diagnosed early 60s and survived over 20 years. My husband was diagnosed at 60 (now 69) and is still chugging along. We just started year 10 of this horrid disease. You just never know.
    • CommentAuthormyrtle*
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2017
     
    Hi jeannebodine. I'm so sorry your husband was stricken with this disease at such a young age. Welcome to this site. I hope you will find both useful information and comfort here.
    • CommentAuthorRona
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2017
     
    Welcome Jeannebodine. This is a safe place with no judgement just information and caring souls to help you through. Everyone here gets it because everyone here has lived or is living it. this site has been a lifeline for me as it has for many others. Good luck and visit here often you now have a whole team with you on this journey.
  3.  
    Thanks so much for your warm welcome!
    • CommentAuthorMartha S.
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2017
     
    So glad I found this site. My DH is 70 and in stage 3 of FTD. The feeling of isolation is one of the hardest parts of this disease for me. We have 3 children and 2 of them live nearby. Our daughter doesn't want to talk about her Dad's health, thankfully her big brother is aware of what is going on. He lives across the street from us and talks to his Dad every day.

    Tried to explain to my daughter that I lost my husband years ago to ED and now I am losing my best friend. Don't think she can handle her Dad's changes.

    He has recently been progressing and this level is very obvious as he is becoming more confused and the periods of confusing things are happening more often. He started this around Easter and this seems to be the fastest he has progressed since we be came aware he had dementia.

    Of course, like most of us that are older we both have other health issues to deal with. I am presently having physical therapy for my shoulder and knee (osteoarthritis in both). Trying to put off another knee replacement and next week see the spine doctor about my back.

    Would I be terrible to say that after reading about what some of you are dealing with I realize I am fortunate because things could be a lot worse.

    So glad to have found someplace with people who "get it".

    Martha
    • CommentAuthorWolf
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2017
     
    Welcome to the site Martha. Everybody here is going through or has gone through the dementia of our spouse. I'm sorry this is happening or as we say - welcome to the club nobody wants to join.
    • CommentAuthorLindylou
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2017
     
    Welcome, Martha. This website has been my lifeline this past year and a half. Please feel free to post when you have questions and need advice, when you need to vent and rage at life, and when you can give advice or support to others. We are all traveling a very difficult path, but we are traveling together and helping each other.
    • CommentAuthorRona
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2017
     
    Welcome Martha as lindylou has said this site has been a lifeline for many of us. No judgement here just understanding and compassion.
  4.  
    Martha, welcome to this safe spot where you will find so much help. Sorry you have to be here. As I approach the two-year mark of losing my husband, I seldom
    comment anymore, but there is a very faithful core of regular contributors who can inform, guide and encourage as you move down this path. You are so fortunate to
    have your children nearby. I wish you strength for the journey.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCharlotte
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2017
     
    Welcome Martha to a great place to land when going through these horrid diseases. Yes, things could be worse but don't 'grade' your situation against others. Sometimes trying to convince ourselves 'things are not as bad as others or could be worse' is a cruel thing many of us can do to ourselves. Some get peace with saying that, others feel more guilt. We all have our own threshold - what is a wall for one is not for others. When I was going through counseling for child abuse I learned the same thing can happen to people - one would be devastated by it, the other barely affected. The same is true as caregivers going through this disease (or any really).
    • CommentAuthorMartha S.
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2017
     
    Thank you everyone for the warm welcome.

    Martha